Natella Voiskounski

“GRANY” FOUNDATION PRESENTS

LOUISE BOURGEOIS: THE ONE WHO IS NOT AFRAID

#3 2016 (52)

The “Tretyakov Gallery Magazine” and Garage Museum of Contemporary Art have been collaborators since the latter’s opening, with articles on the shows of Antony Gormley and Mark Rothko, and the exhibition of works from Frangois Pinault’s collection appearing in these pages. Co-editor Natella Voiskounski met with Garage Chief Curator Kate Fowle recently to discuss Garage’s Louise Bourgeois exhibition - one of the major events of the past exhibition season, which introduced Moscow viewers to the artist’s works from the last two decades of her life. Bourgeois was among the very few artists who represented both modern and contemporary art - she belonged to the 20th and 21st centuries equally, both chronologically and artistically.

CURRENT EXHIBITION

Natella Voiskunski
The "Everyfeelingism" of Iliazd

#1 2016 (50)

Better known as Iliazd, Ilia Zdanevich (1894-1975) contrived to remain at the forefront of the avant-garde all his life. From his youthful efforts to his more mature work, through middle age to old age, he was always at the very epicentre of the avant-garde. During his long lifetime - Iliazd lived to the age of 81 - art movements came and went with dizzying speed, with avant-garde styles in a constant state of flux, appearing, disappearing, reorganizing, merging, changing names. The most consistent figure of the avant-garde, Iliazd was something of a living monument - and he was our compatriot. As the exhibition "Iliazd. The 20th Century of Ilia Zdanevich" runs at Moscow's Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, curator Boris Fridman recalls a unique figure in 20th century culture.

Interview with Orgyen Tobgyal Rinpoche about the Project

Special issue. THE ART OF BUDDHISM

ORGYEN TOBGYAL RINPOCHE, UPON ARRIVAL IN MOSCOW, GAVE AN INTERVIEW TO NATELLA VOISKUNSKI, CO-EDITOR OF THE "TRETYAKOV GALLERY" MAGAZINE.

 

 

 

Alexander Rozhin, Natella Voiskounski
The "Tretyakov Gallery" Magazine and Its "Alexander Golovin. Heritage" Special Issue

Papers of the International academic conference "ALEXANDER GOLOVIN AND THE CULTURE OF THE SILVER AGE" (14.10.2014 - 15.10.2014, State Tretyakov Gallery)

 

 

 

 

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Natella Voiskounski
The Cone Sisters: Collectors for Pleasure

#4 2013 (41)

The New York Jewish Museum's show last year, "Collecting Matisse and Modern Masters: The Cone Sisters of Baltimore", proved breathtaking. The exhibition displayed only a small part of what has been called "a collection of collections" of exquisite paintings, graphic works, prints, sculpture, furniture, embroidery, rugs, and textiles. But the core of the collection, its pride and glory, is Matisse, whose portraiture, still-lifes, sculpture and landscapes were on view. The exhibition told the fascinating story of the two sisters who, led by a female instinct for buying beautiful and often useless — or at least unnecessary — things, developed a perfect taste for genuine art and became distinguished collectors of 19th- and 20th-century modern European art. "A thing of beauty is a joy forever," wrote the British poet John Keats, and once the Cone sisters had experienced the joy of art, they cherished this sublime feeling throughout their lives.

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Natella Voiskounski
A Renaissance Assassinated

#4 2013 (41)

The exhibition "Boris Kosarev: Modernist Kharkiv 1915-1931" at the Ukrainian Museum in New York explores the destinies of Kharkov modernism through the life and artwork of one of its most pre-eminent figures. The tally of years, as on a tombstone, defines the brief period of the development and flourishing of modernism in Kharkov.

Dear friends,

Special issue. SWITZERLAND–RUSSIA: ON THE CROSSROADS OF CULTURES

This Russia-Switzerland special issue of the “Tretyakov Gallery” magazine is dedicated to the cultural ties between our two nations. With its alpine landscapes, ancient cities, age-old castles, picturesque meadows, and Lake Geneva and its surroundings, Switzerland has long enchanted poets, artists and musicians alike with its romantic, soulful spirit.
In his “Letters of a Russian Traveller”, Nikolai Karamzin was the first to give an extensive and clear account of the unforgettable impression that Switzerland had made on him. We remember the great historian and writer’s words: “Why am I not a painter! Why couldn’t I, that very instant, commit to paper the fertile, green Hasli Valley that unfolded in front of my eyes like a most beautiful garden in bloom, surrounded by wild, rocky mountains rising up all the way to the skies!”

Editor-in-chief Alexander Rozhin
Co-editor Natella Voiskounski

 

 

“GRANY” FOUNDATION PRESENTS

Natella Voiskounski
A Renaissance Assassinated

#2 2012 (35)

The exhibition "Boris Kosarev: Modernist Kharkiv 1915-1931" at the Ukrainian Museum in New York explores the destinies of Kharkov modernism through the life and artwork of one of its most pre-eminent figures. The tally of years, as on a tombstone, defines the brief period of the development and flourishing of modernism in Kharkov.

“GRANY” FOUNDATION PRESENTS

Natella Voiskounski
The Cone Sisters: Collectors for Pleasure

#1 2012 (34)

The New York Jewish Museum's show last year, "Collecting Matisse and Modern Masters: The Cone Sisters of Baltimore", proved breathtaking. The exhibition displayed only a small part of what has been called "a collection of collections" of exquisite paintings, graphic works, prints, sculpture, furniture, embroidery, rugs, and textiles. But the core of the collection, its pride and glory, is Matisse, whose portraiture, still-lifes, sculpture and landscapes were on view. The exhibition told the fascinating story of the two sisters who, led by a female instinct for buying beautiful and often useless — or at least unnecessary — things, developed a perfect taste for genuine art and became distinguished collectors of 19th- and 20th-century modern European art. "A thing of beauty is a joy forever," wrote the British poet John Keats, and once the Cone sisters had experienced the joy of art, they cherished this sublime feeling throughout their lives.

Natella Voiskounski
"American Abramtsevo" – the Florence Griswold Museum

Special issue N1. USA–RUSSIA: ON THE CROSSROADS OF CULTURES

Everything was destined to be called "new" in the New World – New York, New Hampshire, New Jersey, not to mention New England and New Britain. To balance all this newness something needs to be old as well, like Old Lyme, where the Florence Griswold Museum – a landmark institution of Connecticut – is located. The Museum is also called the "home of American Impressionism" as a great many of America’s Impressionists enjoyed the warmhearted hospitality of the really vivacious Miss Florence Griswold. Her home became their home from 1899, when she opened the doors of her late Georgian mansion to artists. Soon a boarding house was turned into an artists’ colony centered around Miss Florence – "a born hostess, with that lovely air and remarkable gift of making her guests feel that it was their home, and she was visiting them". That was how Arthur Heming, the artist who was a member of the colony for ten years, described his impression of Florence Griswold in his book "Miss Florence and the Artists of Old Lyme." It was she who managed to make the brotherhood of artists a most famous summer art colony in America.

“GRANY” FOUNDATION PRESENTS

Natella Voiskounski
A LINE THROUGH TIME
FROM KAZIMIR MALEVICH TO JULIE MEHRETU

#1 2011 (30)

The exhibition “On Line: Drawing Through the 20th Century” was quite a notable event in New YorkÕs MOMA 2010-2011 calendar not so much because of the eye-catching works on display, but rather, for its cognitive value. The title given to it says much to an attentive and interested viewer who would recognize KandinskyÕs essay with the same title; besides, it uses a term from the Internet, a kind of a homonym that is familiar to everybody.
The second part of the title marks the scope of the introduction within a century-long period of transformation of drawing, its “groundbreaking history of an art form”, starting with revolutionary innovative processes at the beginning of the 20th century and following its development along the same lines up to the present day; it is formulated by “pushing the line of drawing into real space, expanding its relationship to gesture and form and invigorating its links with painting and sculpture, photography and film, and, notably, dance and performance”.

“GRANY” FOUNDATION PRESENTS

Natella Voiskounski
Man Ray – Alchemist of Art

#2 2010 (27)

The Spring 2010 exhibition “Alias Man Ray: The Art of Reinvention” at the Jewish Museum in New York was a highlight of the city's artistic season, revealing in particular the artist's Jewish identity. Man Ray, later titled a “prophet of the avant-garde” in America, was born Emmanuel Radnitzky in 1890 in Pennsylvania, the eldest child in a Jewish family of Russian origin. Emmanuel was nicknamed “Manny”, and from 1912 onwards, when the Radnitzky family took the surname Ray, he began to use “Man Ray” to label himself as an artist; while never completely rejecting them, he nevertheless came to free himself from his familial roots. As Man Ray he concentrated on building up an artistic identity which found its realization in creative photography, the visual arts, film-making, poetry, literature and philosophy.

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Natella Voiskounski
Futurism and After: David Burliuk (1882–1967)

#1 2009 (22)

February 20 2009 marked the centenary of the publication of the Futurist manifesto, in which Marinetti denied past artistic traditions and expressed his passionate admiration for a new technological era with its emphasis on speed, industrialization, and changes in the style of life, with a resulting strong demand for new artistic forms, styles and media. “The poet must spend himself with warmth, glamour and prodigality to increase the enthusiastic fervor of the primordial elements. Beauty exists only in struggle. There is no masterpiece that does not have an aggressive character. Poetry must be a violent assault on the forces of the unknown, to force them to bow before man. We are on the extreme promontory of the centuries!” Marinetti wrote. “What is the use of looking behind at the moment when we must open the mysterious shutters of the impossible? Time and Space died yesterday. We are already living in the absolute, since we have already created eternal, omnipresent speed. …We want to demolish museums and libraries, fight morality, feminism and all opportunist and utilitarian cowardice.”

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Natella Voiskounski
Contemporary SMS-art The 2008 Biennial at the Whitney Museum, NY

#2 2008 (19)

I happened to be in New York in March this year and naturally did not miss a chance to visit the 2008 Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art. This most important survey of the state of contemporary art in the USA today should by all means be of special interest for me – a representative of a country which has very little (or better to say no) experience in organizing such cultural events: 74 in the Whitney in New York against 2 in Moscow! Nevertheless the idea to make a comparison seemed real – each large-scale survey mirrors the most vivid tendencies common for the state of contemporary art in general. My expectations came true. As it was put by Donna de Salvo, the Whitney Chief Curator and Associate Director for Programmes: “The Biennial is a laboratory, a way of 'taking the temperature', of what is happening now and putting it on view… In dealing with the art of the present, there are no easy assessments, only multiple points of entry. For the Whitney, and for our public, we hope the Biennial is one way in.”

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Natella Voiskounski
A Journey of Architectural Discovery. “The Lost Vanguard” Exhibition: Russian Modernist Architecture 1922-1932

#4 2007 (17)

The exhibition of work by Richard Pare in New York’s Museum of Modern Art features one of the most immediate and tragic phenomena in the history of Soviet (and Russian) modernist architecture. The exhibition “The Lost Vanguard” highlights some 75 photographs by the architectural photographer Richard Pare, who has worked from 1993 to the present day, making eight extensive trips to Russia and the former Soviet republics and creating nearly 10,000 images to compile a timely documentation of numerous modernist structures, including the most neglected. The exhibition was made possible by the Russian Avant-garde Fund and Senator Sergei Gordeev, its founder and president.

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Richard Serra. Style in Steel

#3 2007 (16)

Richard Serra is undeniably a great name in contemporary art. Each of his installations or exhibitions is considered a major artistic event. Serra’s sculpture is associated with a certain laconism in form, as well as minimal plastic means aimed to reach the maximum of expression. His multi-tone self-supporting steel installations are the result of a new sculptural mentality and reveal a novel semantics in sculpture.

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Natella Voiskounski
“They Dipped Their Brushes into Virtually Every Paint Can”

#3 2007 (16)

“Crossroads: Modernism in Ukraine, 1910–1930”, the first major exhibition of early 20th century Ukrainian art was shown in Chicago at the Chicago Cultural Centre, and in New York at the new Ukrainian Museum. Featuring the best of high modernism from Ukraine, the exhibition included more than 70 rarely seen works by 21 Ukrainian artists; each of the works was shown for the first time in the United States. The avant-garde, art nouveau, impressionism, expressionism, futurism and constructivism movements were presented in a new light. Americans – the general public and art critics alike – were equally enthusiastic about the exhibition.

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Natella Voiskounski
“Revival” by Lora Verhovsky. The artist’s first solo-exhibition in Moscow

#1 2007 (14)

The Israeli artist Lora Verhovsky’s exhibition of largesize artworks made of leather and suede in the Museum of Applied Arts was a success – with numerous articles in the press, and sincere appreciation from Muscovites and visitors to the Russian capital. Thus the exhibition “Revival” enjoyed no less popularity than in Israel, and at least one of the attractions was the technique – the so-called “leather intarsia”.

FRIENDS OF THE TRETYAKOV

The American Friends of the Tretyakov Gallery Foundation

#2 2006 (11)

Alexandre Gertsman, prominent New York art dealer, collector and founder and president of the International Foundation of Russian and Eastern European Art- INTART- has chronicled the post-Soviet “moment” through numerous museum and university exhibitions, cultural festivals, symposia, and lectures across the United States, Europe and Russia, with documented complementary books and catalogues of the artists represented. INTART offers a unique opportunity as a representative of both prominently established and lesser known, beginning Russian artists, whose collective experience invariably extracts varied response and discourse, promoting cross-cultural communication.

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Natella Voiskounski
The Modern Russian Portrait

#4 2005 (09)

Modern culture – and modern art, in particular – has encompassed the term “re-actualization”, which refers to cases when a phenomenon or genre is taken out of the archive and presented to the cultural community in a new light, with new meanings and a new functional orientation.

 

WORLD MUSEUMS

Guggenheim-Hermitage: A Budding Co-operation

#4 2005 (09)

The unprecedented exhibition of Russian art labeled precisely and appealingly “RUSSIA!” that opened in New York’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in mid-September has inspired great interest from the West in Russian art, and stimulated similar interest from the Russian side in the Guggenheim museums, particularly the Guggenheim-Hermitage Museum (Las Vegas); it is the only one of the five Guggenheim museums directly associated with Russia – and the contact is with one of the internationally most famous Russian museums.

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Natella Voiskounski
The Body. Art and Science

#3 2005 (08)

The exhibition “The Body. Art and Science” proved a major attraction in Sweden this Spring, with its eternal, allembracing search for a distinctive identity finding brilliant and eye-catching realization at Stockholm’s National Fine Arts Museum. Its curators and contributors to the catalogue (published in Swedish, with an English summary) included Torsten Weimarck, Merten Snickare, Eva-Lena Bengtsson, Ove Hagelin, Mens HolstEkstrum, Karin Siden, Ulrika Nilsson, Eva Ehren Snickare, Solveig Julich, and Ingela Lind. The two forewords to the catalogue were written by Solfrid Soederlind and Jan Lindsten. Generous contributions from museums and private collections from the Netherlands, Germany, Russia, Great Britain, France, Poland and Denmark to the exhibition made the result a major international project.

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

Valentin Rodionov
The Museum of Russian Art in Minneapolis

#3 2005 (08)

In May 2006, the Tretyakov Gallery will celebrate its 150th anniversary. As the years pass, we find ourselves cons tant l y re turni ng to Pav e l Tretyakov and his vital role in the development of Russian art. A successful merchant and ent repreneur, Tre t yakov claimed that “assembling the Russian school, as it is today” was one of his life’s goals. 150 years later, we still remember Tretyakov with immense gratitude, such was his gift to society and future generations.
Exclusive interview with Raymond Johnson for the "Tretyakov Gallery" Magazine - interviewer Natella Voiskounski

EXCLUSIVE PUBLICATIONS

N. Voiskounski
The Florence Griswold Museum

#1 2005 (06)

Everything was destined to be called "new" in the New World – New York, New Hampshire, New Jersey, not to mention New England and New Britain. To balance all this newness something needs to be old as well, like Old Lyme, where the Florence Griswold Museum – a landmark institution of Connecticut – is located. The Museum is also called the "home of American Impressionism" as a great many of America’s Impressionists enjoyed the warmhearted hospitality of the really vivacious Miss Florence Griswold. Her home became their home from 1899, when she opened the doors of her late Georgian mansion to artists. Soon a boarding house was turned into an artists’ colony centered around Miss Florence – "a born hostess, with that lovely air and remarkable gift of making her guests feel that it was their home, and she was visiting them". That was how Arthur Heming, the artist who was a member of the colony for ten years, described his impression of Florence Griswold in his book "Miss Florence and the Artists of Old Lyme." It was she who managed to make the brotherhood of artists a most famous summer art colony in America.

EXCLUSIVE PUBLICATIONS

N. Voiskounski
Stress–Dali–Stress

#4 2004 (05)

To attempt to write anything new, or at least original, about Salvador Dali in 2004, the centenary of his birth, when there have been, and will be written hundreds of pages on his art is a daunting prospect. A genius of both creativity and the creative "escapade", Salvador Dali has become a personification of the stressful 20th century. His name is known to millions, although many of them have never seen a piece of his art – whether a painting or a graphic work, a sculpture or installation, a piece of furniture or jewellery… Nevertheless Dali remains a puzzle, a figure who puzzles viewers, art critics and all those interested in his turbulent life and stressfully shocking art. Dali was consequent in his inconsequence, a vagabond investigating new paths for contemporary art, which would then be taken on by future generations of artists. His boundless imagination led him to both nowhere and everywhere; his vigour made the creative process nonstop; his inner freedom and emancipation which reached the edge of dissoluteness allowed him to respond to any artistic challenge. Dali was like a Midas, whose touch made everything art and gold…

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

N. VOISKOUNSKI
Marc Ash “Tous Ensemble” One and All: A Story with no Finalem

#2 2004 (03)

The beginning of Spring marks the revival of life, but also makes us remember all those who were killed at the different fronts of World War II, and those who were turned into "dust and returned to Earth, whence they came", and whose spirits return to us to remind us about the Holocaust…

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

N. VOISKOUNSKI
REALISM REVISITED

#1 2004 (02)

“In a school of fine arts, it is one’s duty to teach only uncontested truths, or at least those that rest upon the finest examples accepted for centuries." H. Flandrin’s words, are the closest we come to articulating a mission statement at The Florence Academy of Art. With Flandrin, and so many others we could quote, as our guides, we teach the craft of working in the realist tradition similarly to how it was taught in the 19th century ateliers of Western Europe – not so as to produce 19th century work, but because... our most direct link to the traditional values and teachings of the past, which are known to have produced professionallevel artists in the realist tradition, are through those studios. Because I picked up pieces ot the tradition from many different people, what we teach at the Florence Academy is a blend of what I received from many of those I mentioned earlier, necessarily interpreted in my own way.

INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA

N. VOISKOUNSKI
EXPECTATIONS & DISILLUSIONS. 50TH BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

#1 2003 (01)

IT WAS MY FIRST "BUSINESS TRIP" TO VENICE, THOUGH I GUESS NO BUSINESS TRIP TO VENICE IS ONLY BUSINESS. THE IMPACT OF THE CITY IS SO GREAT AND HILARIOUS THAT YOU CAN’T AVOID THE MOST PLEASANT CONTACTS WITH THIS FAIRY-TALE, ALWAYS OVERCROWDED & BUSY PLACE AMIDST THE WATERS. I DID NOT WITNESS THE OPENING CEREMONY OF THE BIENNALE, BUT NOW, HAVING VISITED ALL THE EVENTS, EXHIBITIONS AND PAVILIONS I DO BELIEVE MR. HOWARD JACOBSON WRITING "MY VENICE BIENNALE HELL" FOR THE GUARDIAN THAT THE PEOPLE PARTICIPATING IN THE OPENING CEREMONY WERE IF NOT MUCH MORE THEN AT LEAST NO LESS INTERESTING, ATTRACTIVE, FASCINATING AND SOPHISTICATED THAN THE EXHIBITION ITSELF. AS HE PUT IT: "ART IN QUANTITY – BLACK BOX, VIDEO, CAR-BOOT-SALE INSTALLATION ART - IS NOT A PRETTY SIGHT."

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