Private collection

Ilya Ostroukhov - Moscow artist and collector

Lidia lovleva

Article: 
ART COLLECTORS AND PATRONS
Magazine issue: 
#2 2006 (11)

Ilya Semenovich Ostroukhov was a leading collector in the Moscow art world of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His collection, which later became the Icons and Paintings Museum, located in Ostroukhov's home on Trubnikovsky Pereulok near the Arbat, was referred to in a 1914 city-guide as one of Moscow's foremost attractions[1], and was frequented by art lovers, which gave considerable trouble, as well as pleasure, to its owner. Ostroukhov was by that time a well-known landscape artist, first actively involved in the Peredvizhniki (Wanderers) movement, who later rebelled against and broke with that group, creating in 1903 together with fellow malcontents who had split from the movement the Union of Russian Artists, concentrated primarily on the Moscow tradition of painting.

Ilya Ostroukhov - Moscow artist and collector

20th-century Art in the Tretyakov Gallery

Irina Lebedeva

Article: 
INTERNATIONAL PANORAMA
Magazine issue: 
#2 2006 (11)

The Tretyakov Gallery is one of the major museums of national art in Russia. Evolving from a private collection, today it boasts an art collection unique in its characteristics, diversity and scope. Its significance and its place in the contemporary art scene is defined by its special mission, one that combines two very important functions. One of them is traditional - to preserve, study and popularize the vast pool of works of Russian art of the i2th-20th centuries, assembled during the 150 years of the museum’s existence. Another function, a very important one today, is to address topical issues of the contemporary art scene.

20th-century Art in the Tretyakov Gallery

"Art of the 20th Century. The View from Vienna"

Andrei Gamlitsky

Article: 
CURRENT EXHIBITIONS
Magazine issue: 
#3 2006 (12)

From June 8 until July 2 2006, works from the collection of Monsignor Otto Mauer were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art on Petrovka Street in Moscow. The exhibition was organized by the Culture Committee of the Moscow Government under the auspices of the Austrian Embassy, within the programme of “Vienna Days in Moscow”. The exhibition’s concept, idea and organization by Art and Business Culture Management Curators Milena Wildenauer and Dr. Eva Stangl-Teimer.

"Art of the 20th Century. The View from Vienna"

From June 8 until July 2 2006, works from the collection of Monsignor Otto Mauer were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art on Petrovka Street in Moscow. The exhibition was organized by the Culture Committee of the Moscow Government under the auspices of the Austrian Embassy, within the programme of “Vienna Days in Moscow”. The exhibition’s concept, idea and organization by Art and Business Culture Management Curators Milena Wildenauer and Dr. Eva Stangl-Teimer.

Easter Eggs FROM THE IMPERIAL PORCELAIN FACTORY

Ivan Golsky

Article: 
PRIVATE COLLECTION
Magazine issue: 
#2 2018 (59)

The illustrated album “The Imperial Porcelain Factory. Easter Eggs. St. Petersburg. Private Collection” was published in Spring 2017 by the GRANY Foundation.  Its appearance marked the conclusion of a major academic project, one of interest for connoisseurs of decorative art and champions of Russia’s heritage alike.

Easter Eggs FROM THE IMPERIAL PORCELAIN FACTORY

* General management of the project: Natella Voiskounski. Ivan Golsky, author- compiler, researcher, custodian, The Museum of Ceramics and the 18th Century Kuskovo Estate. Consultants: Tamara Nosovich, Deputy-director, Custodian of the Porcelain Fund of the Peterhof Museum-Reserve; Anna Dobakhova, Expert, P.M. Tretyakov Independent Art Research & Expertise. Images in this publication are from the relevant museum websites.

In Memory of Nikolai Meshcherin

Nikolai Gagman

Article: 
ART COLLECTORS AND PATRONS
Magazine issue: 
#2 2007 (15)

In 2006, the year of its 150th jubilee, the Tretyakov Gallery acquired a significant number of works by the artist Nikolai Meshcherin (1864-1916). Presented as a gift by Nikolai Gagman, art restorer and long-standing member of the Igor Grabar All-Union Centre for Art Research and Restoration, the donation included 17 oil and tempera paintings and six pastels by Meshcherin, as well as archive documents and photographs shedding light on the artist’s life and work. Many years ago, these were purchased from Meshcherin’s widow Lydia Goriacheva-Meshcherina by Gagman’s father Alexander Nikolaevich, a Doctor of Medicine and one of the founders of surgical urology. For many decades, this small treasure remained in the Gagman family. Nikolai Gagman took the best possible care of his father’s collection, doing everything within his means to make Meshcherin better known as an artist. In 1987, Nikolai Gagman organised an exhibition of Meshcherin’s work and published a catalogue to accompany the event, writing the introduction and selecting some fascinating archive material for the catalogue himself. The catalogue included all of Meshcherin’s works from museums and private collections in Russia which Gagman had succeeded in locating.

In Memory of Nikolai Meshcherin

Among Moscow Collectors. DRAWINGS FROM MOSCOW PRIVATE COLLECTIONS OFTHE LATE 19TH - EARLY 20TH CENTURY

Irina Shumanova, Yevgenia Ilukhina

Article: 
ART COLLECTORS AND PATRONS
Magazine issue: 
#3 2007 (16)

Over the last ten years the Tretyakov Gallery has been displaying drawings from its collections at temporary exhibitions. The exhibition programme has had a continuous focus on the history of the collection of 18th-20th century drawings. The gallery’s 20th exhibition in the series reflects a new stage in the history of its collection - namely, the significant enlargement of the collection in the first decade following the Bolshevik revolution due to new acquisitions from private Moscow collections.

Among Moscow Collectors. DRAWINGS FROM MOSCOW PRIVATE COLLECTIONS OFTHE LATE 19TH - EARLY 20TH CENTURY

"But of course it is creative work - this undying, unbelievable love, the unrelenting obsession, the frantic persistence and obstinacy in searching and pursuing, the ceaseless work in the domain of art and history and, first and foremost, work of the eye, not the outer eye, ... but the inner eye, an intuitive insight into the essence of a piece of art, the collector's perspicacity."

Igor Grabar

 

A Space of Experiment

Article: 
COLLECTORS AND COLLECTIONS
Magazine issue: 
#2 2009 (23)

“A Certain State of the World?” - a selection of works from the Frangois Pinault Foundation collection - was the second project put together by the Garage Centre for Contemporary Culture. Moscow’s new exhibition venue owes its name to the fact that initially the building housed a garage, for buses, built in 1926-27 to the design of the famed Constructivist architect Konstantin Melnikov.

A Space of Experiment

“A Certain State of the World?” - a selection of works from the Frangois Pinault Foundation collection - was the second project put together by the Garage Centre for Contemporary Culture. Moscow’s new exhibition venue owes its name to the fact that initially the building housed a garage, for buses, built in 1926-27 to the design of the famed Constructivist architect Konstantin Melnikov.

MIKHAIL GERMASHEV: AN ARTIST AND HIS COLLECTORS

Stanislav Kuznetsov

Article: 
ART COLLECTORS AND PATRONS
Magazine issue: 
#3 2016 (52)

The names of the major Russian collectors - the Tretyakovs, the Morozovs, the Ryabushinskys, the Tereschenkos or the Khanenkos - are well known. But other patrons of the arts and collectors have been undeservedly forgotten, although it is thanks to them and their acquisitions that we have the chance to revisit the work of lesser-known and even forgotten artists.

MIKHAIL GERMASHEV: AN ARTIST AND HIS COLLECTORS

The names of the major Russian collectors - the Tretyakovs, the Morozovs, the Ryabushinskys, the Tereschenkos or the Khanenkos - are well known. But other patrons of the arts and collectors have been undeservedly forgotten, although it is thanks to them and their acquisitions that we have the chance to revisit the work of lesser-known and even forgotten artists.

ART PASSIONS

Article: 
COLLECTORS AND COLLECTIONS
Magazine issue: 
#1 2010 (26)

Collecting artwork is a passion - one which can develop in many different ways. Private collections become themed collections, then later part of a museum or museum holding. Thus, the Tretyakov Gallery was initially the private collection of Pavel Mikhailovich and Sergei Mikhailovich Tretyakov; equally, the holdings of the Museum of Private Collections originated from several private collections put together by famous individuals. Valery Dudakov, one of the most influential Russian collectors - respectfully called “Patriarch” by his fellow art lovers - has plans to transfer his collection to this museum. Employed as an expert by the auction houses such as Sotheby’s, Christie’s and Phillips, he has written two books and dozens of articles about both artists of the first third of the 20th century and nonconformist artists, and made five films.

ART PASSIONS

THE THYSSEN-BORNEMISZA MUSEUM. A journey through the history of art in the centre of Madrid

José María Goicoechea

Magazine issue: 
#4 2015 (49)

The English King Henry VIII, as portrayed by Hans Holbein, lives alongside a Picasso harlequin in the same palace in the centre of Madrid. Canaletto's Venice landscapes mingle with street scenes of Berlin created by Grosz, while self-portraits by Rembrandt and Lucien Freud share the walls. The "Portrait of Giovanna Tornabuoni" by Ghirlandaio and Lichtenstein's "Woman in Bath" offer different visions of serenity, as Caravaggio's "Santa Catalina" and "Santa Casilda" by Zurbarán try to match one another in holiness. Famous faces by Hopper with El Greco, or Matisse with Cézanne take in the scene.

THE THYSSEN-BORNEMISZA MUSEUM. A journey through the history of art in the centre of Madrid

The English King Henry VIII, as portrayed by Hans Holbein, lives alongside a Picasso harlequin in the same palace in the centre of Madrid. Canaletto's Venice landscapes mingle with street scenes of Berlin created by Grosz, while self-portraits by Rembrandt and Lucien Freud share the walls. The "Portrait of Giovanna Tornabuoni" by Ghirlandaio and Lichtenstein's "Woman in Bath" offer different visions of serenity, as Caravaggio's "Santa Catalina" and "Santa Casilda" by Zurbarán try to match one another in holiness.

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