Porcelain

White Gold: The Tradition and Modernity of Chinese Porcelain

Article: 
CURRENT EXHIBITIONS
Magazine issue: 
#2 2007 (15)

Organized by the Tretyakov Gallery and the State museum and exhibition centre ROSIZO, the exhibition “White Gold: The Tradition and Modernity of Chinese Porcelain” which opened on March 27 at the Tretyakov Gallery, has been one of the first and most momentous events marking the Year of China in Russia.

White Gold: The Tradition and Modernity of Chinese Porcelain

Organized by the Tretyakov Gallery and the State museum and exhibition centre ROSIZO, the exhibition “White Gold: The Tradition and Modernity of Chinese Porcelain” which opened on March 27 at the Tretyakov Gallery, has been one of the first and most momentous events marking the Year of China in Russia.

White Gold: THE TRADITION AND MODERNITY OF CHINESE PORCELAIN

Press Department, Tretyakov Gallery

Magazine issue: 
#3 2017 (56)

Organized by the Tretyakov Gallery and the state museum and exhibition centre ROSIZO, the exhibition “White Gold: The Tradition and Modernity of Chinese Porcelain” which opened on March 27 2007 year at the Tretyakov Gallery, has been one of the first and most momentous events marking the Year of China in Russia. A milestone of Chinese culture, porcelain - and the traditions and rituals connected with it - have made a colossal contribution to the development of world civilization. The exhibition traces the evolution of the art of porcelain in Jingdezhen - the centre of porcelain production in China.

White Gold: THE TRADITION AND MODERNITY OF CHINESE PORCELAIN

Organized by the Tretyakov Gallery and the state museum and exhibition centre ROSIZO, the exhibition “White Gold: The Tradition and Modernity of Chinese Porcelain” which opened on March 27 2007 year at the Tretyakov Gallery, has been one of the first and most momentous events marking the Year of China in Russia.

Paired Chinese Vases. WITH SUBJECTS FROM THE NOVEL "WATER MARGIN" BY SHI NAI’AN

Anna Shulgat

Magazine issue: 
#3 2017 (56)

Artefacts made by masters from China and Japan have always had a very special role in the interiors of the Oranienbaum palaces, and the Chinese Palace had one of the most significant collections of Oriental art. After the death of Empress Catherine II, Oranienbaum passed through a succession of owners; in 1831, it became the property of Grand Duke Mikhail Pavlovich, and later came into possession of his wife, Grand Duchess Yelena Pavlovna. She continued the tradition of collecting Chinese and Japanese art and, thanks to her efforts, newly-acquired artefacts created in the 19th century started to appear in the Chinese Palace, including a pair of monumental cylindrical vases with high bellnecks and handles in the form of four-legged dragon-lizards.

Paired Chinese Vases. WITH SUBJECTS FROM THE NOVEL “WATER MARGIN” BY SHI NAI’AN

Shanghai Museum. SELFLESS COMMITMENT TO SOCIETY

Shanghai Museum

Magazine issue: 
#3 2017 (56)

The Shanghai Museum was inaugurated in 1952 on the site of the former racecourse building located at 325 West Nanjing Road, and in 1959 moved into the Zhonghui Building located at 16 South Henan Road. Following the advances of the decades and the accompanying evolution of society, construction of the Museum’s new building started at the People’s Square in the city centre in August 1993, under the auspices of the Shanghai city government. At the end of 1995, the Galleries of Chinese Ancient Bronze, Ceramics, and Sculpture opened on a trial basis. The new Shanghai Museum in its completed form was officially opened to the public on 12 October 1996.

Shanghai Museum. SELFLESS COMMITMENT TO SOCIETY
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