Ivan Aivazovskiy

Kuindzhi and His Students. A MEMORABLE STUDY TRIP TO CRIMEA REASSESSED

Vladimir Syrkin

Article: 
INVESTIGATIONS AND DISCOVERIES
Magazine issue: 
#3 2018 (60)

A new investigation reveals fascinating details about the time Kuindzhi’s students spent in Crimea at their teacher’s generous invitation. “Beauty begets a painter like the earth begets grass" these words from the “Essays about Crimea" by the renowned expert on regional history and culture Yevgeny Markov fully apply to Arkhip Kuindzhi. The artist’s entire life was intimately associated with the peninsula: he was born into a family of Greek migrants from Crimea; in his youth he visited Aivazovsky’s studio in Feodosia; his landscape A Tatar Saklia [Hut] in Crimea” earned him the rank of artist; and he attempted to found a colony of artists there... The desire to share its beauty also inspired Kuindzhi to organize and finance a summer arts study trip for his students in Crimea.

Kuindzhi and His Students. A MEMORABLE STUDY TRIP TO CRIMEA REASSESSED

A new investigation reveals fascinating details about the time Kuindzhi’s students spent in Crimea at their teacher’s generous invitation.

REPORTING AIVAZOVSKY in 19th Century Russian Periodicals

Natalya Kalugina

Article: 
POINT OF VIEW
Magazine issue: 
#1 2017 (54)

Ivan Aivazovsky’s rapid development as an artist, as well as the speed with which he worked, was a phenomenon of real interest to the Russian public from the very beginning of his career. A variety of periodical publications, most notably “Khudozhestvennaya Gazeta” (The Arts Gazette), kept readers informed, on an almost daily basis, about the marine painter’s life, and also charted the manner in which developments in his technique were received by his contemporaries: they provide a fascinating insight into how Aivazovsky matured as an artist.

REPORTING AIVAZOVSKY in 19th Century Russian Periodicals

AIVAZOVSKY’S ESTATES AND LANDS*

Irina Pogrebetskaya

Article: 
POINT OF VIEW
Magazine issue: 
#1 2017 (54)

Although the main source of Aivazovsky’s income was the property that he owned, little is known today about exactly what belonged to the artist, or even where his land holdings were located. Art historian Irina Pogrebetskaya, for many years the chief curator at the Aivazovsky Picture Gallery in Feodosia, considers the evidence that remains.

AIVAZOVSKY’S ESTATES AND LANDS

* The article draws on: Pogrebetskaya, I.M. 'Aivazovsky’s Estates and Lands' // Materials of research conference “Ivan Aivazovsky’s Artistic Heritage and Traditions”, dedicated to the centenary of Aivazovsky’s death and the 120th anniversary of the Gallery inauguration. Aivazovsky Picture Gallery, Feodosia, 2000. Pp. 28-33.

FATHER OF THE TOWN. Ivan Aivazovsky and Feodosia: A Lifelong Attachment

Dmitry Losev

Article: 
“GRANY” FOUNDATION PRESENTS
Magazine issue: 
#1 2017 (54)

The artistic accomplishments of Ivan Aivazovsky gained him renown throughout Russia, as well as further afield in Europe and America. Yet for all such international fame, his attachment to Feodosia, the small town in Crimea where he was born in 1817 and where he would spend the greater part of his life, never diminished: he was a model citizen, whose contributions to the development of Feodosia remain appreciable today.

FATHER OF THE TOWN. Ivan Aivazovsky and Feodosia: A Lifelong Attachment

The artistic accomplishments of Ivan Aivazovsky gained him renown throughout Russia, as well as further afield in Europe and America. Yet for all such international fame, his attachment to Feodosia, the small town in Crimea where he was born in 1817 and where he would spend the greater part of his life, never diminished: he was a model citizen, whose contributions to the development of Feodosia remain appreciable today.

 

AIVAZOVSKY’S HOUSE AND GUESTS

Tatyana Gaiduk

Article: 
MUSEUMS OF RUSSIA
Magazine issue: 
#1 2017 (54)

“My address - Feodosia, always.” That was how Ivan Aivazovsky would refer to his permanent home, the centre of both his life and work. Wherever the artist travelled, to St. Petersburg, Moscow, Paris, Venice, Constantinople or New York, he always returned to his native town. To this day the artist’s house attracts guests - art-lovers, specialists, connoisseurs and those are simply drawn to Aivazovsky’s work. Within its walls, music is still played and artists still work, and the house continues to capture the hearts and souls of new admirers of the talents of its famous resident.

AIVAZOVSKY’S HOUSE AND GUESTS

THE ARTIST AND HIS BENEFACTOR: Ivan Aivazovsky and Alexei Tomilov

Vera Bodunova

Article: 
ART COLLECTORS AND PATRONS
Magazine issue: 
#1 2017 (54)

“Among other nonsense (as well as certain justified criticisms), I hear that Gaivazovsky[1] paints too quickly and sloppily. His works are more like stage sets than paintings, they say. I no longer have the energy to refute these accusations; I can only remark sorrowfully that ‘at least the stage sets are delightful, you must concur.’”[2] In such terms, without hiding his sincere chagrin, the well-known patron of the arts Alexei Tomilov wrote in 1842 to the marine painter Ivan Aivazovsky, who was, by then, acquiring a reputation in Europe

THE ARTIST AND HIS BENEFACTOR: Ivan Aivazovsky and Alexei Tomilov

THE MANY FACES OF IVAN AIVAZOVSKY

Lyudmila Markina

Article: 
INVESTIGATIONS AND DISCOVERIES
Magazine issue: 
#1 2017 (54)

A great marine painter who left a vast artistic legacy behind him, Ivan Aivazovsky was himself often portrayed by his contemporaries, while as a talented portraitist himself, the artist also created around 10 self-portraits over the course of his long artistic career. He was painted by a whole host of his fellow artists including friends from the Academy of Arts such as Vasily Sternberg and Mikhail Scotti; older contemporaries such as Academician Alexei Tyranov and the “patriarch” of the Moscow School of Painting, Vasily Tropinin; the chief ideologue of the “Peredvizhnik” (Wanderers) movement, Ivan Kramskoi; and the “apologist” for salon painting, Konstantin Makovsky. Two marble busts of Aivazovsky survive, one by Alexander Belyaev, depicting the artist as a young man, the other by Leopold Bernhard Bernstamm, created in the painter’s old age. After Aivazovsky’s death, a bronze statue was erected in Feodosia, designed by the sculptor Ilya Ginzburg. Despite all this, Aivazovsky’s depiction in art has never been the subject of significant study. How did the great artist perceive himself, and how did he wish to be seen by future generations? How, indeed, was he viewed by his contemporaries?

THE MANY FACES OF IVAN AIVAZOVSKY

THE AIVAZOVSKY BROTHERS

Shahen Khachatrian

Article: 
“GRANY” FOUNDATION PRESENTS
Magazine issue: 
#4 2016 (53)

Prominent cultural figures not only glorify the power of the human spirit and the creative power of genius, but their country of birth, too, or the national culture to which they belong. This was never more true than with Ivan Aivazovsky. The fate of the marine painter of international fame is set off in some specific sense by that of his elder brother, Gabriel Aivazovsky, an outstanding educator, teacher and pastor of the Armenian Church. The brothers were friends, they helped one another and always recognized the undertakings which brought success to each of them. Born into an Armenian family living in the town of Feodosia in Crimea, they later met in Venice in 1840 and agreed to spell and pronounce their last name, Gaivazovsky, in Russian as “Aivazovsky” and in Armenian as “Aivazian”. The contribution of both brothers to international, as well as Russian and Armenian culture is widely acknowledged.

THE AIVAZOVSKY BROTHERS

THE AIVAZOVSKY “BRAND” IN THE SURGING SEA OF RUSSIA’S ELITE

Mikhail Kamensky

Article: 
POINT OF VIEW
Magazine issue: 
#4 2016 (53)

Ivan Aivazovsky, that most renowned artist, outstanding representative of the Russian academic school and internationally recognized seascape artist, has long been a symbol of prosperity, stability and investment wisdom for Russian society. Alongside artworks by Isaak Levitan, Vasily Polenov, Ivan Shishkin and Konstantin Makovsky, the homes of certain “most prominent” representatives of the “Russian World” are often decorated with Aivazovsky’s paintings - as if they are an equivalent of the gold reserve or a signifier of strong faith in the stability of the government; a symbol of power, and an articulation of the conservative notion of the “imperishable”; an attribute of luxury, and a reminder of an enviable dowry or rich inheritance.

THE AIVAZOVSKY “BRAND” IN THE SURGING SEA OF RUSSIA’S ELITE

AIVAZOVSKY OUTSIDE RUSSIA

Ivan Samarine

Article: 
POINT OF VIEW
Magazine issue: 
#4 2016 (53)

Aivazovsky was the key artist for the new generation of Russian collectors that emerged in the 1990s, whose work established new records for Russian art at auction. Ivan Samarine, who worked then in the newly-established Russian department at Sotheby’s, remembers a remarkable decade, as well as some key collectors from earlier generations, whose lasting enthusiasm for Aivazovsky ensured that the artist’s reputation remained constant on the international art scene. Samarine’s “Light, Water and Sky: The Paintings of Ivan Aivazovsky”, coauthored with Gianni Caffiero, will be published in a Russian version this year.

AIVAZOVSKY OUTSIDE RUSSIA
Syndicate content