THE BODY AND DIGITAL LOGIC. Conflictual Performance in Our Age: The Artist Anne Imhof

Georg Imdahl

Magazine issue: 
#1 2021 (70), Special issue "Germany - Russia. On the Crossroads of Cultures"

* Prof. Georg Imdahl is Professor for Art and the Public (“Kunst und Offentlichkeit”) at the University of Fine Arts Münster. A Düsseldorf-based independent art critic, he contributes primarily to the “Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Texte zur Kunst and Deutschlandfunk”. He is a member of the critics' association AICA (Association Internationale des Critiques d’Art).

Performance art has set a new tone in contemporary art over the last 15 years. One of the most remarkable German artists in this field is Anne Imhof, whose interdisciplinary works unite installation, performance, music and painting. Her five-hour performance “Faust” in the German Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2017 brought her international renown - and she still polarises observers in the art world.

Mickey Mahar, Josh Johnson and Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Mickey Mahar, Josh Johnson and Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York

Division, this scourge of Western civil society, can also be a sign of value, namely whenever an artistic Œuvre polarises and is evaluated differently by various voices which then initiate discourse. From this perspective, it is the purpose and a function of contemporary art to generate controversy that is fuel to argumentation. This process is characterised by Anne Imhof’s Œuvre and, in particular, her piece “Faust”, which earned the highly prominent Golden Lion award for its performance in the German Pavilion at the Biennale in Venice in 2017. Claire Bishop, one of the most influential observers of contemporary art, especially in the area of performance art, said that the contemporary “digital logic is completely realized” in the work “Faust”[1]. This is a statement that we would rather expect in connection with artists such as Hito Steyerl or Ed Atkins and which is to be understood as confirmation in the context of Bishop’s essay “Black Box, White Cube, Gray Zone: Dance Exhibitions and Audience Attention”.[2] Benjamin Buchloh, on the other hand, draws a (modernistic) line from Michael Asher, Vito Acconci and Andrea Fraser to Tino Sehgal, as well as another counterposed (anti-modernistic) line from Richard Wagner to Joseph Beuys and to Imhof, in order to subject her work “Faust” to rather biting criticism in his “Artforum” review “Rock Paper Scissors. Benjamin H. D. Buchloh on some means and ends of sculpture at Venice, Münster, and Documenta”.[3] And reactions to Imhof’s Œuvre in the criticism found in the daily press (especially in the German-language press) ranged from allergic to polemical. The work was accused of embodying ‘Berghain aesthetics’, club coolness, contrived zeitgeist-critique. But exactly those attitudes of aimless existence are well suited to the portrait of a generation that can only look forward to a discomforting future. Susanne Pfeffer, curator of the German Pavilion in 2017, described Imhof's work as the “Expression of a 21st-century conditio humana: trained by late capitalism, dominated by bio-politics, constantly observed, distracted, isolated even in groups”.[4]

Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof. Berlin, 2016
Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof. Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York

In the course of a boom over approximately the last 15 years, performance art as a genre has set a new tone in contemporary art, pushed into the spotlight by Tino Sehgal's 2005 slapstick appearance at the Venice Biennale's German Pavilion. It is in the nature of this genre to surprise the audience, to irritate with the unexpected (as Sehgal did with his cheerfully dancing surveillance personnel) or challenge with conflict (as Santiago Sierra did with his war “veterans” standing silently in the corner[5]). Equally inherent in performance is that it is ephemeral and transitory, making its documentation all the more important, a matter of survival for the genre, taken over by an audience who films, shares and posts to the internet - and records its view of things in the process.

Sarah Lindermayer, Josh Johnson, Billy Bultheel and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Sarah Lindermayer, Josh Johnson, Billy Bultheel and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York

At the same time, hardly anyone saw Imhof's remarkable performance almost 20 years ago in a Frankfurt location: “Duell”, created in 2001 even before she began her studies at the Frankfurt Städelschule, a career-maker. Imhof graduated from the Städelschule as the master student of Judith Hopf. In the red-light district around Frankfurt's main train station, in front of a backdrop of high- rise bank buildings, where the opposites of drug abuse and financial capital are particularly striking, the young artist rented a dance club after hours to create a performance which has almost completely been forgotten - a duel. At the time, Imhof was as fascinated by boxing as she was by punk rock and electronic music; she hired a band and drew a chalk boxing ring on the floor in which several opponents competed against one another in a series of bouts. There was no referee to ensure a proper match. Instead, Imhof came up with a special set of rules for the programme: the boxers were to fight as long as the musicians were playing, and the musicians were to play as long as the boxers were fighting (the boxers and musicians did not know one another). A macabre kind of feedback.

Approximately 50 guests, invited by word of mouth only, made their way to the dance club to experience the event, which lasted about five hours: An audience, says Imhof, that followed the action with a certain amount of distance and anxiety. The afternoon ended with quite a few bloody noses. Hardly any photos still exist, which is not at all surprising as the most commonplace camera today, the smartphone, was far from ubiquitous at the time. Imhof describes “Duell” as “a loop of dependence allowing no end and subject to observation”.[6]

Josh Johnson in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Josh Johnson in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York

Filming and photography of Imhof's later works were to become all the more common. This is another reason why “Angst” (2016), “Faust” (2017) and “Sex” (2019) have turned the works of the artist, who has just moved from Frankfurt to Berlin (she was born in Gießen, not far from Frankfurt, in 1978) into some of the most discussed of her generation. A theatrical performance art that is not afraid of pathos (and which is, however, not hollow), and, typical of contemporary art, with artistic practice formulated in a variety of genres, transitioning from illustration to painting to installation to performance and borrowing from adjacent genres, such as dance theatre.[7]

Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski

Imhof cites the works of the British painter Francis Bacon (1909-1992) as one of the sources of her inspiration. Imhof's drawings for the direction and setting of her performance art have their own aesthetic qualities. At the same time, her works always reflect identifiably, if abstractly and subcutaneously, a thoroughly unstable, precarious, disillusioned present. The thing that ultimately characterises Imhof's work in a unique way is the principle of collaboration, calling for many various types of expertise and players for performance, dance, music and film. The team includes performance artist Douglas, musicians, musician and composer Billy Bultheel, the trained philosopher Franziska Aigner, and sometimes specialists such as a drone administrator, a falconer or a tightrope walker; Nadine Fraczkowski plays an important role as photographer and documentary film maker. Many of the participants are from Imhof's closer circle of friends.

Mickey Mahar in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Mickey Mahar in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski

With a slight sense of metaphorics, the Sunday afternoon in Frankfurt could be read as a sinister and energy- charged loop (with a gentle carnival barker's touch), as an arena of a “solidarische Grausamkeit”[8], solidarity in cruelty, being fought out - an interface between image and reality: “Duell” not only performed and represented a conflict-charged present, the work created it. On the other hand, it presages in a certain sense Imhof's artistic path, which led through terrain that was actually seen as stigmatised: the spectacle. Guy Debord coined the “Society of the Spectacle” as a particularly degenerative occurrence in the modern society of the masses and the media with his influential 1967 essay of the same name. The spectacle, wrote the founding member of the revolutionary artists' group “Situationist International”, “wants to arrive at nothing other than itself”, “is the opposite of dialogue”, “the contemporary model of the reigning form of life in society”.[9]

The following assertation by Debord seems almost prophetic: “If the spectacle, seen in the narrower context of the ‘mass communication media' which are its most oppressive superficial manifestations, can seem to encroach on society as simple instrumentalisation, then in reality this instrumentalisation is nothing neutral, but rather exactly that instrumentalisation which corresponds to the spectacle's entire self-movement.”[10] Indeed today's rapidly spreading habit among audiences to photograph, film and disseminate exhibitions of any and all kinds - not only “Dance Exhibitions” (Claire Bishop)[11] - points to the assumption of an impulse to prefer not experiencing the live occurrence directly, but rather instead to filter, preserve and domesticate the experience. (We are reminded of Rabih Mroués “The Pixelated Revolution” of 2012, his outstanding video piece for “Documenta 13”. In this piece, Mroué analyses how several victims of the Syrian civil war filmed their killers with their telephones at the very moment of their own deaths, instead of taking cover.)

In the conception and posture of contemporary art, however, it is unavoidable that a position be presented against a verdict such as Guy Debord's, even as plausible as it is, and that the discredited spectacle is thus explored and rehabilitated as an artistic option. Here, every taboo seems to ask to be broken. Imhof's performance art is spectacular. Indeed, it presents an example of that societal self-movement from the point of view of mass communication media, but here the spectacle acquires a new dimension of depth. Imhof's images of collective alienation and individuation are highly symbolic and indecipherable, they tease the audience, lock themselves up and lock out the onlookers.

This is also true of “Faust”, the five-hour production Imhof showed in 2017 at the German Pavilion in Venice. The story and its events are associatively charged, ambivalent, they use viewer reaction as a resonating cavity, connecting them in some senses with the dance theatre of Pina Bausch. As tangibly as the protagonists' gestures of conciliation, affection and empathy may appear, they remain indifferent, cool and solipsistic in their conduct between inner conflict, tenderness and violence, also against one another.

The structure of glass and steel in the Pavilion proved just as ambiguous. It conveyed the insignias of modern financial power (also as a cliche representation of itself) in the historically steeped space and served as the proverbial sounding board, as an amplifier that could also be described as a framework and “aesthetic of a designer avantgarde”[12], as a catwalk for the protagonists.[13] What once stood for transparency and clarity (one is reminded of the architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe) now symbolises only the status quo of social coldness. This minimalistic empowerment is unmatched in the history of this pavilion. On this stage, the performers, all somehow similar in habitus and appearance, seemed uprooted, free, resolute, but, at the same time, indifferent, looking at the audience, through and beyond the audience - always just a bit arrogant.

This is not intended to present the reciprocal behaviour between performers and viewers “as the ‘inclusion of the audience' in a somehow participative manner,” says Juliane Rebentisch: “No community arises here. Not only does the asymmetry between the performers and the
audience persist [...]. The audience no longer remains what it was; the openness of the situation explodes its unity.”[14] The boundary to the happening (in which the audience is, by definition, included in the occurrence) remains.

The herd mentality of the excessively photographing audience was not, by the way, initially a part of the artistic strategy. Imhof even wanted to prohibit it at first. When it came time for the second part of the three-part work “Angst” in the Berlin museum venue Hamburger Bahnhof, Imhof reports, she posted notices prohibiting photography. Viewers had been all too free in physically approaching the performers, which became “a real problem” for them. Not only did the performers feel severely disturbed, they ultimately even held certain things back because the audience had become intrusive (once, during “Faust”, as Eliza Douglas lay under the glass floor, someone placed their smartphone on the glass, after which a performer stepped on the phone). The performers “almost felt like they were being hunted.” The large number of cameras entailed a “form of the loss of control”. However, as it was impossible to control the crowd of up to 1,500 viewers at the Hamburg train station, Imhof continues, appropriate reactions were developed: returning strict glares, taking the phone from the hand holding it. The sharp tone that Imhof explicitly evoked in the earlier work “Duell” emerges in her later works from the encounter, conflict and confrontation with the audience. In “Faust” the team started to pay closer attention to the reactions shared in social media, to find out which moments were regarded here as particularly ‘iconographic'; these moments were not always the same as those “we would have chosen as principal images”, says Imhof. The polarity of inclusion and exclusion, essential movers in Imhof's previous works, is shifted to reception, as now it is the mass dissemination of images by the audience that decides which impressions survive. This is also the digital logic of our time.

Anne Imhof
Anne Imhof
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski

ANNE IMHOF (born 1978 in Gießen) has lived and worked in Berlin since 2020. She studied at the Hochschule fQr Gestaltung Offenbach (HfG) and the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main. She presented her first individual exhibition at the Portikus Frankfurt in 2013 and has made numerous appearances worldwide since then. Her latest production, “Sex,” debuted at the Tate Modern in London in 2019. Her awards include the 2012 Absolventenpreis [Graduate Award] of the Städelschule Frankfurt; the 2015 Preis der Nationalgalerie für junge Kunst (National Gallery Prize for Young Artists) for the installation "Rage"; the 2017 Goldener Löwe (Golden Lion) for best national submission at the Biennale di Venezia.

 

  1. Translation adapted.
  2. https://www.academia.edu/38135170/Black_Box_White_Cube_Gray_Zone_Dance_Exhibitions_and_Audience_Attention (accessed on 03.10.2020) See also Claire Bishop's standard work “Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship,” London/New York 2012.
  3. https://www.artforum.com/print/201707/benjamin-h-d-buchloh-on-some-means-and-ends-of-sculpture-at-venice-muenster-and-documenta-70461 (accessed on 03.10.2020)
  4. Boris Pofalla, 'Einigkeit und Recht und Zombies', “Frankfurter Allgemei- ne Sonntagszeitung” of 14.05.2017 https://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/kunst/biennale-von-vene-dig-einigkeit-und-recht-und-zom-bies-15014344.html (accessed 05.10.2020, translation adapted)
  5. See also Georg Imdahl, Ausbeute. “Santiago Sierra und die Historizität der zeitgenössischen Kunst,” Hamburg 2019, p. 171 sqq.
  6. Anne Imhof in a telephone conversation with the author on September 27, 2020 (translation adapted). All further direct and indirect quotes by Imhof are taken from this conversation.
  7. For a more detailed definition of contemporary art, see Peter Osborne, “Anywhere or not at all. Philosophy of Contemporary Art,” London/New York 2013.
  8. I borrow the usage of the term from Alexander Koch, "Abstraktion aus Notwehr. Santiago Sierras solidarische Grausamkeit", in: Vlado Velkov (Ed.), public abstraction, Cologne 2015, p. 78-90, p. 90.
  9. Guy Debord, “La Societe du Spectacle”, Paris 1967, German: “Die Gesellschaft des Spektakels”, Berlin 1996, p. 18, 15 (English translations adapted).
  10. Loc. cit., p. 22 (translation adapted).
  11. “Black Box, White Cube, Gray Zone: Dance Exhibitions and Audience Attention” https://www.academia.edu/38135170/Black_Box_White_Cube_Gray_Zone_Dance_Exhibitions_and_Audience_Attention (accessed 1.10.2020)
  12. Silke Hohmann, in: monopol 2019, No. 5, p. 124 (translation adapted).
  13. Wiebke Roloff Halsey, “Monaden auf dem Catwalk”, in: “Theater heute”, 2019, No. 5 / May, p. 52 (translation adapted).
  14. Juliane Rebentisch, “Dark Play. Anne Imhofs Abstiaktionen”, in: Susanne Pfeffer (Ed.), Faust, Köln 2017, pp. 25-33, p. 31 (translation adapted).
Illustrations
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York
Franziska Aigner and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Franziska Aigner and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York
Franziska Aigner and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Franziska Aigner and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York
Franziska Aigner and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Franziska Aigner and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed atHamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York
Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof. Berlin, 2016
Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York
Mickey Mahar and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Mickey Mahar and Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof’s Angst II, performed at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin, 2016
Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin/New York
Franziska Aigner and Katja Cheraneva in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Franziska Aigner and Katja Cheraneva in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski
Franziska Aigner, Billy Bultheel, Emma Daniel, Josh Johnson and Enad Marouf in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Franziska Aigner, Billy Bultheel, Emma Daniel, Josh Johnson and Enad Marouf in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski
Franziska Aigner, Billy Bultheel, Frances Chiaverini and Josh Johnson in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Franziska Aigner, Billy Bultheel, Frances Chiaverini and Josh Johnson in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski
David Imhof and Josh Johnson in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
David Imhof and Josh Johnson in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski
Franziska Aigner and Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Franziska Aigner and Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski
Eliza Douglas and Mickey Mahar in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Eliza Douglas and Mickey Mahar in Anne Imhof’s Angst, performed at Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski
ANNE IMHOF. Duel, 2001
ANNE IMHOF. Duel, 2001
Courtesy of the artist
ANNE IMHOF. Duel, 2001
ANNE IMHOF. Duel, 2001
Courtesy of the artist
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Frances Chiaverini in Anne Imhof «Faust», 2017
Frances Chiaverini in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Emma Daniel in Anne Imhof «Faust», 2017
Emma Daniel in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Josh Johnson in Anne Imhof «Faust», 2017
Josh Johnson in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
Eliza Douglas in Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Stine Omar, Lea Welsch, Mickey Mahar, Ian Edmonds, Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof «Faust», 2017
Stine Omar, Lea Welsch, Mickey Mahar, Ian Edmonds, Billy Bultheel in Anin Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Mickey Mahar and Stine Omar in Anne Imhof «Faust», 2017
Mickey Mahar and Stine Omar in Anin Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Frances Chiaverini, Mickey Mahar, Eliza Douglas, Lea Welsch, Ian Edmonds in Anne Imhof «Faust», 2017
Frances Chiaverini, Mickey Mahar, Eliza Douglas, Lea Welsch, Ian Edmonds in Anin Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Stine Omar, Lea Welsch, Mickey Mahar, Ian Edmonds, Billy Bultheel in Anne Imhof «Faust», 2017
Stine Omar, Lea Welsch, Mickey Mahar, Ian Edmonds, Billy Bultheel in Anin Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
Billy Bultheel and Ian Edmonds in Anne Imhof «Faust», 2017
Billy Bultheel and Ian Edmonds in Anin Anne Imhof, Faust, 2017
German Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia
© Photography: Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy of the artist, German Pavilion 2017
ANNE IMHOF. Sex. BMW Tate Live Exhibition Installation view Tate Modern, 2019
ANNE IMHOF. Sex. BMW Tate Live Exhibition Installation view Tate Modern, 2019
ANNE IMHOF. Sex. BMW Tate Live Exhibition Installation view Tate Modern, 2019
ANNE IMHOF. Sex. BMW Tate Live Exhibition Installation view Tate Modern, 2019
ANNE IMHOF. Sex. BMW Tate Live Exhibition Installation view Tate Modern, 2019
ANNE IMHOF. Sex. BMW Tate Live Exhibition Installation view Tate Modern, 2019
ANNE IMHOF. Sex. BMW Tate Live Exhibition Installation view Tate Modern, 2019
© Tate Photography (Oliver Cowling / Andrew Dunkley)
Anne Imhof
Anne Imhof
© Photo: Nadine Fraczkowski

Back

Tags:

 

MOBILE APP OF THE TRETYAKOV GALLERY MAGAZINE

Download The Tretyakov Gallery Magazine in App StoreDownload The Tretyakov Gallery Magazine in Google play