CURRENT EXHIBITIONS - 2016

Galina Churak
AN ARTIST OF "HELLENIC" SPIRIT

#4 2016 (53)

Marking in advance the bicentenary of the birth of Ivan Aivazovsky (1817-1900), which will fall on July 29 2017, the Tretyakov Gallery presents a major exhibition of this great master, a truly timeless artist. “Whatever anyone may say, Aivazovsky is a star of the most splendid magnitude. A star not only in his homeland, but one which shines within the entire history of art. Aivazovsky’s legacy, in the three to four thousand canvases that he created, contains truly phenomenal paintings that will forever remain as such.” Thus wrote the artist Ivan Kramskoi, that most thorough and intelligent art critic, one who had a most precise understanding of the artistic process.

Ksenia Karpova
Gely Korzhev’s Biblical Cycle: HARD STEPS TOWARDS TRUTH

#3 2016 (52)

The current large-scale retrospective of Gely Korzhev is part of a series of innovative projects in the Tretyakov Gallery exhibition programme aimed at acquainting viewers with the work of major Soviet and post-Soviet artists. Works from Korzhev’s biblical cycle, on which the artist worked for a quarter of a century - from the mid-1980s until his death - are an essential part of the show: this ambitious project became the major undertaking of the final years of Gely Korzhev’s long artistic career.

 

Anna Dyakonitsyna
GELY KORZHEV: I HAVE THE RIGHT

#3 2016 (52)

The retrospective of Gely Korzhev (1925-2012) at the Tretyakov Gallery is one of the most eagerly awaited shows in recent years. In today’s Russia, Korzhev’s art sounds a poignant and vital note. In a class of its own, his work was never fully understood by his contemporaries, just as it has yet to be fully appreciated by subsequent generations. His paintings, however, can provide an invaluable key to understanding the history of post-war Russian art, locating it within the broader context of world art of the second half of the 20th century

 

Rosalind P. Blakesley
DISTINGUISHED VISITORS: A RUSSIAN CULTURAL PANTHEON IN LONDON

#2 2016 (51)

The epochal exhibition “Russia and the Arts: The Age of Tolstoy and Tchaikovsky” runs at London’s National Portrait Gallery until June 26, bringing the pride of Russia’s 19th-century cultural pantheon to the UK. Its British curator Rosalind P. Blakesley recalls the origins, development and ambitions of this major Anglo-Russian cultural collaboration.

 

Tatiana Karpova
THE BEST OF ALBION. “From Elizabeth to Victoria” from London’s National Portrait Gallery

#2 2016 (51)

While the British school of painting has always been appreciated in Russia, it is, unfortunately, far from fully represented in the collections of the country’s museums. Such an omission has been significantly remedied in recent years with a series of shows from various British museums held in Russia, many in the framework of the UK-Russia Year of Culture 2014, which included the exhibitions “Francis Bacon and the Legacy of the Past”, at the Hermitage; “Unrivalled Wedgwood”, held at Moscow’s Museum of the Applied and Folk Arts; “Charles Rennie Mackintosh: Manifesto of the New Style” presented at the Moscow Kremlin Museums; “Oscar Wilde. Aubrey Beardsley. The View from Russia” at the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts; and the “‘English Breakfast’ in Russia. Late 18th-19th Century” exhibitionat the Historical Museum.

Natella Voiskunski
The "Everyfeelingism" of Iliazd

#1 2016 (50)

Better known as Iliazd, Ilia Zdanevich (1894-1975) contrived to remain at the forefront of the avant-garde all his life. From his youthful efforts to his more mature work, through middle age to old age, he was always at the very epicentre of the avant-garde. During his long lifetime - Iliazd lived to the age of 81 - art movements came and went with dizzying speed, with avant-garde styles in a constant state of flux, appearing, disappearing, reorganizing, merging, changing names. The most consistent figure of the avant-garde, Iliazd was something of a living monument - and he was our compatriot. As the exhibition "Iliazd. The 20th Century of Ilia Zdanevich" runs at Moscow's Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, curator Boris Fridman recalls a unique figure in 20th century culture.

 

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