Final Weeks to See These Exhibitions at The Met Fifth Avenue, The Met Breuer, and The Met Cloisters!

The Mysterious Landscapes of Hercules Segers

Closing May 21
The Met Fifth Avenue

Hercules Segers
Hercules Segers, (Dutch, ca. 1590-ca. 1638). The Mossy Tree, ca. 1625-30. Lift ground etching printed in green, on a light pink ground, colored with brush; unique impression. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam; on loan from the City of Amsterdam, collection Michiel Hinloopen (1619-1708), 1885.

The great experimental printmaker Hercules Segers (Dutch, ca. 1589–ca. 1638), one of the most fertile artistic minds of his time, created otherworldly landscapes of astonishing originality. With a unique array of techniques whose identification still puzzles scholars, he etched extraordinary, colorful landscapes and still lifes. This exhibition is the first to display all of Segers's prints in varying impressions alongside a selection of his paintings and is the first large selection of his fascinating work to be shown in the United States.

The exhibition is made possible by the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund and The Schiff Foundation.

It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures

Closing May 21
The Met Cloisters

Rosary
Rosary, 1500-1539. Netherlandish. Boxwood, L: 20 7/8 in. (52.8 cm). Musée du Louvre, Département des Objects d'art, Paris.
© Musée du Louvre, Photo: Craig Boyko/Ian Lefebvre

Small in scale, yet teeming with life, miniature boxwood carvings have been a source of wonder since their creation in the Netherlands in the 16th century. The execution of these intricately carved prayer beads and diminutive altarpieces—some measuring a mere two inches (five centimeters) in diameter—is as miraculous as the stories they tell. In this exhibition, the first of its kind, the ingenious techniques of the carvers are revealed.

The exhibition is made possible by the Michel David-Weill Fund.

It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; and the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

Breuer Revisited: New Photographs by Luisa Lambri and Bas Princen

Closing May 21
The Met Breuer

Luisa Lambri
Luisa Lambri. Untitled (The Met Breuer, #03) (detail), 2016

In this exhibition, two contemporary photographers examine five major public buildings designed by Marcel Breuer (1902-1981), the renowned architect whose accomplishments include The Met Breuer. Italian artist Luisa Lambri (born 1969) and Dutch artist Bas Princen (born 1975) each look at how these buildings are used and occupied today and how they reflect and have changed with the passage of time.

The exhibition is made possible by The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation.

The Poetics of Place: Contemporary Photographs from The Met Collection

Closing May 28
The Met Fifth Avenue

Jean-Marc Bustamante
Jean-Marc Bustamante (French, born 1952). Tableau (T30.78), 1978, printed 2000. Silver dye bleach print, 40 x 51 in. (101.6 x 129.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Jennifer and Joseph Duke Gift, 2000 (2000.493.2)

This exhibition will survey the diverse ways in which contemporary artists have photographed landscape and the built world. Through 41 works, it will explore this topic over the span of a half century and feature artists including Matthew Brandt, Roe Ethridge, Sarah Anne Johnson, and Wolfgang Staehle.

Seurat's Circus Sideshow

Closing May 29
The Met Fifth Avenue

Georges Seurat
Georges Seurat (French, 1859-1891). Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), 1887-88. Oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Stephen C. Clark, 1960 (61.101.17)

This exhibition will survey the diverse ways in which contemporary artists have photographed landscape and the built world. Through 41 works, it will explore this topic over the span of a half century and feature artists including Matthew Brandt, Roe Ethridge, Sarah Anne Johnson, and Wolfgang Staehle.

Renaissance Maiolica: Painted Pottery for Shelf and Table

Closing May 29
The Met Fifth Avenue

Plate with the Visconti arms
Plate with the Visconti arms, ca. 1480-1500. Italian, probably Deruta. Maiolica (tin-glazed earthenware); Overall (confirmed): H. 3 5/16 x Diam. 15 in. (8.4 x 38.1 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Fletcher Fund, 1946 (46.85.16)

This exhibition of Renaissance maiolica from The Met collection celebrates the publication of "Maiolica, Italian Renaissance Ceramics in The Metropolitan Museum of Art" by Timothy Wilson. The maiolica tradition, which flourished from the 15th to the 17th century, brought together innovations of Renaissance goldsmithry, sculpture, and painting in humble media and functional forms, but often for an elite clientele. Renaissance Maiolica explores how different functions dictated the ways maiolica was seen and decorated, and groups of objects are installed to suggest how they were used.

Renaissance Portrait Medals from the Robert Lehman Collection

Closing May 29
The Met Fifth Avenue

Massimiliano Soldani
Massimiliano Soldani (Italian, 1656-1740). Francesco Redi, 1677. Model for medal, wax on slate, Diam. 6.6 cm. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.1320 a)

This exhibition is the first to present the Robert Lehman Collection's portrait medals. The selection features 30 Italian and Northern European bronze medals, ranging from early examples of the mid-15th century to rare 17th-century wax models. The exhibition, which explores the development and role of the portrait medal in Renaissance culture, as well as production techniques, celebrates the recently published catalogue of the Lehman Collection's holdings of European sculpture and metalwork.

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